Friday, February 15, 2013

PPBF: Peach and Blue


KID LIT BOOK CLUB REMINDER:
1.There is still time to join in the February discussion by posting your favorite Caldecott winner. I'm looking forward to chatting about these fabulous books and adding to my library list!

2. March's topic is friendship (picture book). So I'm going to get a jump start by posting one of my favorite friendship books for PPBF! Keep reading!


TitlePeach and Blue
Author/IllustratorSarah S. Kilborne/ Steve Johnson and Lou Fancher
Publisher/Date: Dragonfly Books: Alfred A. Knopf, Inc./1994
Genre/Audience: Fiction/Ages 3+
Themes: friendship, frogs, peaches, dreams and wishes, color

Opening
"One still summer afternoon, a large blue-bellied toad wandered away from his pond at the bottom of a small hill. He jumped through the grass, leaping high over the snake holes, and climbed up and up and up to the hill top. There he rested in the shade of a tree and looked out over the pond below.

Synopsis: (From Amazon.com)
He is a blue-bellied toad hopping aimlessly through life.  She is a sad peach yearning for escape and adventure.  Then one remarkable day, Peach and Blue explore the pond that Blue calls home and awaken each other to a world neither has ever really seen before.  Lush illustrations by the award-winning illustrating team of The Salamander Room and The Frog Prince, Continued perfectly complement this unique and graceful story.

Why I Love This Book
Once I allowed myself to suspend reality enough to get past the odd-couple combination of a toad and a talking peach, I found this book truly touching. Sentimental and compassionate, these fast friends help each other see the world in new and beautiful ways. But this story is not just about adventure. There is a soft undercurrent that speaks to the transitory nature of life.

Listen to the final sentences:
"I don't think I'll last forever, " said Peach.
"That's okay, " said Blue. "Not many folks do. But until then, you have me, and I have you."

This book would make a lovely and gentle read-aloud for a child dealing with the illness of a grandparent, for example. It speaks to how we can spend quality time with the people we love.

The language is lyrical and the illustrations are warm and inviting. Unfortunately, it is out of print. I hope you can find this gem at your local library!

Resources:
Peach describes the colors she sees at the pond in rhyme. Find a quiet place, outside or in, to observe. Describe the colors you see. Be as detailed as you can!

Preschool Friendship Activities across centers, curriculum and circle time

Write a story! Near the end of the book, the kingfisher helps Peach by flying her from the pond to the bench. There is a beautiful illustration of this scene. Use this illustration as a writing prompt. What would the story be like if the kingfisher were the main character with Peach, instead of Blue? How would that change the story? What would their adventure be like? Would Peach see more than the pond with a flying friend?

The Dragonfly Books edition has four activity connections printed on the end-papers.

For more links to Perfect Picture Books, a collection of bloggers who contribute at Susanna Leonard Hill’s site, click here.

9 comments:

  1. This looks like such a sweet story. Thanks for sharing it... even if it's out of print.

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  2. Look forward to reading this one - thanks.

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  3. how lovely this sounds, Laura. Thank you for sharing.

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  4. Laura, what an unusual and intriguing book. I like stories about unlikely friendships that make think about differences. Lovely pick today for PPBF.

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  5. This looks like an unusual friendship. I enjoyed your talking point activities--makes me think about and appreciate my own friends that much more!

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  6. I have this book but I'm not sure I was all that drawn to it until just now, after reading your review and activities. Thanks!

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  7. I recently read a book about an apple and a worm who were friends. It kind of creeped me out. A frog and a peach doesn't seem quite so bad. At least the frog is not coming out of the peaches head. I like the artwork alot. i may look for this one and see how it compares to the apple/worm story. Thanks for sharing!

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  8. A frog and a peach are an interesting pair. Sounds like they share a positive life philosophy - that we could all benefit from.

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  9. This sounds like a lovely, quiet book, Laura - the kind I love :) Thanks for sharing it - it's one I hadn't heard of before!

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